Current NASA Education Opportunities

Last Updated on June 28, 2016
Check out the following NASA opportunities for the education community. Full descriptions are listed below

Teacher Professional Development Programs at the NASTAR Center
Audience: K-12 Educators
Workshop Dates: Multiple dates July 5-28, 2016

2016 Summer Professional Development Workshops at Wallops Educator Resource Center
Audience: K-12 Educators
Workshop Dates: Multiple dates July 7-Aug. 9, 2016

Third Annual NASA Exploration Science Forum
Audience: Higher Education Educators and Students
Registration Deadline: July 8, 2016
Event Date: July 20-22, 2016

Sally Ride EarthKAM @ Space Camp Announces Summer 2016 Mission
Audience: K-12 and Informal Educators
Mission Date: July 12-16, 2016

2016 von Kármán Lecture Series — Attend in Person or View Online
Audience: All Educators; Students in Grades 9-12 and HigherEducation
Next Lecture Date: July 14, 2016, at 7 p.m. PDT (10 p.m. EDT)

Free Downloads: Mars Explorers Wanted Posters
Audience: All Educators and Students

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PREVIOUSLY PROMOTED OPPORTUNITIES…
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Smithsonian TechQuest: Astronaut Academy
Audience: Designed for Families With Children Ages 10 to 14, but Open to All
Next Event Date: June 25, 2016, 10:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. EDT

Live Broadcast of Space Launch System Booster Test Firing
Audience: All Educators and Students
Event Date: June 28, 2016, at 10:05 a.m. EDT

NASA Postdoctoral Program Fellowships
Audience: Graduate Students and Ph.D. Scientists
Next Application Deadline: July 1, 2016

U.S. Department of Education Accepting Applications for Investing in Innovation (i3) Scale-up and Validation Competitions
Application Deadline: July 15, 2016

Space Shuttle Thermal Protective Tiles and Blankets Available for Educational Use
Audience: Educational Institutions, Museums and OtherEducation Organizations

Call for Proposals — Citizen Science for Earth Systems Program
Audience: Higher Education and Informal EducationInstitutions
Proposal Deadline: July 21, 2016

National Science Foundation’s Historically Black Colleges and Universities — Undergraduate Program
Audience: Historically Black Colleges and Universities
Research Initiation Awards — Notice of Intent Deadline: July 26, 2016
Various Projects — Notice of Intent Deadline: Sept. 6, 2016
Broadening Participation Research Centers — Preliminary Proposal Deadline: March 21, 2017

Call for Papers: NASA in the ‘Long’ Civil Rights Movement Symposium
Audience: Academics, Graduate Students and Independent Scholars
Abstract Submission Deadline: July 31, 2016
Symposium Dates: March 16-17, 2017

Help NASA Study Mars — Planet Four: Terrains
Audience: All Educators and Students
Project Timeframe: Ongoing Through Mid-2016

‘CineSpace’ Short Film Competition
Audience: All Educators and Students
Entry Deadline: July 31, 2016

Future Engineers ‘Think Outside the Box’ Challenge
Audience: K-12 Educators and Students
Entry Deadline: Aug. 1, 2016

National Science Foundation’s Innovative Technology Experiences for Students and Teachers
Audience: Organizations Interested in Implementing Pre-K-12 STEM Education Programs
Full Proposal Deadline: Aug. 10, 2016

Free Education Webinar Series From the GOES-REducation Proving Ground
Audience: 6-12 Educators
Next Event Date: Sept. 17, 2016, at 11:30 a.m. EDT

GLOBE El Niño Field Campaign and Webinar Series
Audience: K-12 Educators
Next Webinar Date: Sept. 19, 2016, at 8 p.m. EDT

National Science Foundation’s Advancing Informal STEM Learning Program
Audience: Organizations Interested in Advancing STEM Learning in Informal Environments
Full Proposal Deadline: Nov. 8, 2016

Access NASA Data to Analyze Astronaut Radiation Exposure in Space
Audience: Educators and Students, Ages 14 to 18
Entry Deadline: Dec. 3, 2016

Call for Submissions — NASA Announcement for High Impact / Broad Implementation STEM EducationPartnerships (EDUCATION01SP16)
Audience: Education Institutions and Organizations
Applications Accepted on a Rolling Basis Through Dec. 31, 2017

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Don’t miss out on upcoming NASA educationopportunities.
For a full list of events, opportunities and more, visit the Educator and Student Current Opportunity pages on NASA‘s website:
— Educators http://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html
— Students http://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/current-opps-index.html

Are you looking for NASA educational materials to support your STEM curriculum?

Search hundreds of resources by subject, grade level, type and keyword at http://www.nasa.gov/education/resources/.

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NEW THIS WEEK!
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Free Education Webinars From NASA Educator Professional Development

The NASA STEM Educator Professional Development Collaborative at Texas State University is presenting a series of free webinars open to all educators. Join NASA educationspecialists to learn about activities, lesson plans, educator guides and resources that bring NASA into your classroom. Registration is required to participate. To register, simply click on the link provided beneath the webinar description.

Planetary Missions — NASA, We’re Out There: Exploring Strange New Worlds
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades 5-8
Event Date: June 23, 2016, at 6 p.m. EDT
Explore NASA curriculum that assigns participants roles as scientists living on a planet, orbiting a distant star, who are on the threshold of exploring a planetary system for the first time. Teams explore planets they’ve created by using the same methods NASA scientists use to explore our solar system.Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/181702

Planetary Missions — NASA, We’re Out There: MAVEN
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades 3-5
Event Date: June 29, 2016, at 6:30 p.m. EDT
Participants will get an overview of the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN, or MAVEN, mission and activities in the “Red Planet — Read, Write, Explore” educator guide. This guide contains six activities focused on language arts, science and art. Discussion will include classroom modifications.Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/182883

Planetary Missions — NASA, We’re Out There: Exploring Ice in the Solar System
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades K-5
Event Date: June 30, 2016, at 4 p.m. EDT
Explore the wonders of snow and ice. Temperature, ice cores, snow depth, snow density, and the duration of winter — a deep snow pack and late season snow extend the winter season — determine the severity of winter and play a role in fresh water availability and climate change. Participants will both explore and experiment with the wonders of water phase change. Thiseducation resource involves winter hikes and other outdoor activities, as well as indoor experiments, for elementary students. Register online to participate.https://www.etouches.com/186212

For a full schedule of upcoming webinars, visithttp://www.txstate-epdc.net/events/.

Please direct questions about this series of webinars to Steve Culivan at stephen.p.culivan@nasa.gov.

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Teacher Professional Development Programs at the NASTAR Center

The National AeroSpace Training and Research, or NASTAR, Center is hosting a series of teacher professional development programs throughout the month of July. Here’s your chance to experience acceleration in a centrifuge, pilot an airplane simulator, or explore the gas laws in an altitude chamber. Each one-day workshop is worth eight hours of continuingeducation.

One-day workshops are planned for multiple dates in July 5-28, 2016. To see a full list of workshop dates and to download a registration packet, visit http://www.nastarcenter.com/education/teachers/.

The NASTAR Center is located in Southampton, Pennsylvania, a northern suburb of Philadelphia. The center is an Affiliate Member of the NASA Pennsylvania Space Grant Consortium. Funding from the NASA Pennsylvania Space Grant Consortium supports these programs, so they are offered at no cost to teachers.

Questions about this series of workshops should be directed to Greg Kennedy at gkennedy@nastarcenter.com.

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2016 Summer Professional Development Workshops at Wallops Educator Resource Center

The Educator Resource Center at NASA‘s Wallops Flight Facility in Virginia is hosting a series of free summer professional development workshops for educators. Learn about these upcoming workshops:

Elementary GLOBE (K-4 Educators)
Workshop Date: July 7, 2016
GLOBE introduces students to the study of Earth system science while enhancing literacy skills through natural world exploration. Participants in this one-day workshop will receive free Elementary GLOBE materials.

Earth Science Week (5-12 Educators)
Workshop Dates: July 11-14, 2016
Celebrate Earth Science Week with a series of one-day workshops focusing on Earth science and the missions at Wallops Flight Facility that are helping NASA learn more about our home planet.

NASA‘s BEST (3-8 Educators)
Workshop Date: Aug. 8-9, 2016
Learn about the NASA‘s Beginning Engineering, Science and Technology program during this two-day workshop. NASABEST brings the principles of engineering alive to younger audiences, and the content is great for supplementing curricula.

Each workshop is limited to 20 participants. Early registration is encouraged.

Contact Samuel Henry at samuel.s.henry@nasa.gov for complete workshop details and registration information.

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Third Annual NASA Exploration Science Forum

NASA‘s Solar System Exploration Research Virtual Institute, or SSERVI, is pleased to announce the third annual NASAExploration Science Forum. It will be held July 20-22, 2016, atNASA‘s Ames Research Center in Moffett Field, California.

This year’s forum will feature scientific discussions of human exploration targets of interest, including the moon, near-Earth asteroids and the moons of Mars. Science sessions will focus on recent mission results and in-depth analyses of science and exploration studies. The forum will feature dedicated side events for graduate students and young professionals.

Registration is free, and attendance by the entire exploration science community is encouraged. The conference registration deadline is July 8, 2016.

For more information and to register to attend, visithttp://nesf2016.arc.nasa.gov/.

Please direct questions about this workshop to Brian Day atBrian.H.Day@nasa.gov.

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Sally Ride EarthKAM @ Space Camp Announces Summer 2016 Mission

Registration is open for the Summer 2016 mission for the Sally Ride EarthKAM @ Space Camp program taking place July 12-16, 2016. During the mission, students worldwide may submit requests to have a camera aboard the International Space Station capture an image of a specific location on Earth. Related resources, including images and activities, are available for use in the classroom. The optional online activities are targeted at middle school students but are adaptable for other grade levels. All students and educators are welcome, including participants in afterschool programs.

For more information and to register for the upcoming mission, visit https://www.earthkam.org/.

Please submit questions about the Sally Ride EarthKAM @ Space Camp program via https://www.earthkam.org/contact.

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2016 von Kármán Lecture Series — Attend in Person or View Online

The Theodore von Kármán Lecture Series, named after the founder of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and presented by JPL’s Office of Communication and Education, shares the excitement of the space program’s missions, instruments and other technologies.

Lectures take place twice per month, on consecutive Thursdays and Fridays. The Thursday lectures take place in JPL’s Theodore von Kármán Auditorium, and Friday lectures take place at Pasadena City College’s Vosloh Forum. Both start at 7 p.m. PDT (10 p.m. EDT). Admission and parking are free for all lectures. No reservations are required, but seating is limited. The Thursday evening lectures are streamed live for viewing online. Archives of past lectures are also available online.

Next Lecture in the Series:

To Boldly Go … Well, You Know: NASA‘s Dawn Mission to the Asteroid Belt
Event Date:
July 14 and July 15, 2016, at 7 p.m. PDT (10 p.m. EDT)
http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/events/lectures_archive.php?year=2016&month=7
Launched in 2007, the Dawn mission completed a spectacular exploration of Vesta in 2011-12 and arrived in orbit around Ceres last year. These massive residents of the asteroid belt hold clues that are helping scientists understand the dawn of the solar system. Join Dr. Marc Rayman, mission director and chief engineer for the Dawn mission, for a discussion about Vesta, Ceres and the ion propulsion that is allowing Dawn to study them.

For more information about the Theodore von Kármán Lecture Series, including a complete list of upcoming lectures, visithttp://www.jpl.nasa.gov/events/lectures.php.

Questions about this series should be directed tohttp://www.jpl.nasa.gov/contact_JPL.php.

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Free Downloads: Mars Explorers Wanted Posters

Mars needs you! In the future, Mars will need all kinds of explorers, farmers, surveyors, teachers … but most of all, YOU! Join NASA on the Journey to Mars as we explore with robots and, one day, send humans there.

Download a Mars poster that speaks to you. Each of the eight posters represents a different type of explorer NASA is seeking.

You can view them online, print them and share them with your friends.

Check out the posters at http://mars.nasa.gov/multimedia/resources/mars-posters-explorers-wanted/.

And for more information about Mars, visithttp://mars.nasa.gov/.

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PREVIOUSLY PROMOTED OPPORTUNITIES…
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Smithsonian TechQuest: Astronaut Academy

Smithsonian TechQuest: Astronaut Academy, at the Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center in Chantilly, Virginia, is a free alternate-reality game that will challenge you to become an astronaut-in-training for a future trip to Mars. Choose what role you will play on the mission; engage in fun interactive activities; and explore the science, technology, engineering, and mathematics skills you will need as a next-generation space traveler. Along the way, you’ll learn about some of the museum’s fascinating artifacts.

Instructions and guidance are given via a special webpage accessed on your mobile device. Players should bring their own phones or devices equipped with an internet browser and a camera. Having a digital picture-taking device (smartphone, tablet, camera) is highly recommended but not required.

The game is aimed at upper elementary and middle school visitors and their families. Do you want to bring a group?Reservations are required for groups larger than 15.

The next offering of the Astronaut Academy is on June 25, 2016. Begin your training with Astronaut Orientation in the Claude Moore Education Center Classroom 1 located on the first level across from the restrooms. Astronaut Orientation is offered at regular intervals between 10:30 a.m. and 2:30 p.m.The last opportunity to start the game is at 2:30 p.m. A self-guided activity, the game should take between 60 and 90 minutes, and staff will help you along the way.

For more information, including a full list of upcoming Astronaut Academy dates, visit http://airandspace.si.edu/events/techquest/.

Please direct questions about the Smithsonian TechQuest: Astronaut Academy to the visitor service line at 202-633-2214.

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Live Broadcast of Space Launch System Booster Test Firing

Did you know that NASA is building the largest solid propellant rocket booster in the world? NASA will test a full-scale, test version of the booster, designated Qualification Motor-2, orQM-2, on June 28, 2016, at the Orbital ATK test facility in Promontory, Utah. The test is scheduled for 10:05 a.m. EDT.

QM-2 is a five-segment solid propellant booster that will help power the Space Launch System, or SLS. The two-minute, full-duration static test is a huge milestone for the SLS Program and will measure the booster’s performance at a cold motor conditioning target of 40 degrees Fahrenheit — the colder end of its accepted propellant temperature range.

The solid rocket boosters — measuring 177 feet long and producing 3.6 million pounds of thrust — operate in parallel with the main engines for the first two minutes of flight. The boosters provide more than 75 percent of the thrust needed for the launch vehicle to escape the gravitational pull of Earth.

SLS is an advanced, heavy-lift launch vehicle that will provide an entirely new capability for science and human exploration beyond Earth’s orbit. When completed, two five-segmentboosters and four RS-25 main engines will power the world’s most powerful rocket, with the Orion spacecraft atop, to achieve human exploration to deep-space destinations, including our journey to Mars.

The test will be streamed at http://www.ustream.tv/nasahdtvand broadcast on NASA TV. Please make plans to watch with your students and colleagues.

To learn more about the Space Launch System, visithttp://www.nasa.gov/exploration/systems/sls/.

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NASA Postdoctoral Program Fellowships

The NASA Postdoctoral Program provides early-career and more senior scientists the opportunity to share in NASA‘s mission. NPP Fellows work on one- to three-year assignments with NASA scientists and engineers at NASA centers and institutes to advance NASA‘s missions in Earth science, heliophysics, planetary science, astrophysics, space bioscience, aeronautics, engineering, human exploration and space operations, astrobiology, and science management.

U.S. citizens, lawful permanent residents and foreign nationals eligible for J-1 status as a research scholar may apply. Applicants must have completed a doctorate or equivalent degree before beginning the fellowship, but they may applywhile completing degree requirements. Applicants who earned the Ph.D. more than five years before the deadline date are categorized as senior fellows; all applicants, no matter their category, must apply and become eligible for an NPP award via the same process.

Interested applicants may apply by one of three annual application deadlines: March 1, July 1 and November 1.

For more information and application procedures, go tohttps://npp.usra.edu/.

Please direct questions about this fellowship opportunity tonpphelp@usra.edu.

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U.S. Department of Education Accepting Applications for Investing in Innovation (i3) Scale-up and Validation Competitions

The U.S. Department of Education is seeking applications for the Investing in Innovation, or i3, Scale-up and Validation competitions. These grant competitions seek to provide competitive grants to applicants with a record of improving student achievement and attainment in order to expand the implementation of and investment in innovative practices that are demonstrated to have an impact on improving student achievement or student growth, closing achievement gaps, decreasing dropout rates, increasing high school graduation rates, or increasing college enrollment and completion rates.

These grants will (1) allow eligible entities to expand and develop innovative practices that can serve as models of best practices; (2) allow eligible entities to work in partnership with the private sector and the philanthropic community; and (3) identify and document best practices that can be shared and taken to scale based on demonstrated success.

The deadline for submittal of applications for both the Scale-up and Validation competitions is July 15, 2016.

For more information about these grant opportunities, please visit http://innovation.ed.gov/what-we-do/innovation/investing-in-innovation-i3/fy-2016-competition/.

Please direct questions about these opportunities to Kelly Terpak at i3@ed.gov.

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Space Shuttle Thermal Protective Tiles and Blankets Available for Educational Use

NASA invites U.S. educational institutions to request space shuttle thermal protective tiles, space shuttle thermal protective blankets, and other special items offered on a first-come, first-serve basis while quantities last. Organizations previously allocated thermal protective tiles may request an additional three tiles.

Nonprofit museums, libraries and planetariums (sponsored through their respective State Agency Surplus Property, or SASP, organization) are also eligible to make requests. Visit the link below for special instructions to request items. To find the contact information for the SASP representative for your area, visit http://www.gsa.gov/portal/content/100851.

A nominal shipping fee must be paid online with a credit card. To make a request for special items online, visithttp://gsaxcess.gov/htm/nasa/userguide/Special_Item_Request_Procedure.pdf.

Please direct questions about this opportunity toGSAXcessHelp@gsa.gov.

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Call for Proposals — Citizen Science for Earth Systems Program

NASA is seeking proposals for a new program as part of theNASA Research Announcement “Research Opportunities in Space and Earth Sciences (ROSES) 2016.” The Citizen Science for Earth Systems Program’s primary goal is to develop and implement capabilities to use contributions from the public to advance understanding of Earth as a system. The program will complement NASA’s observation of Earth from space, air, land and water by engaging the public in NASA’s mission. The program will advance the use of citizen science in scientific research about Earth by directly supporting citizen science activities, as well as by developing technology to further citizen science research.

Through this solicitation, two types of proposals are sought — citizen science research and low-cost sensor deployment for the collection of well-calibrated citizen science data.

Proposals are due July 21, 2016.

For more information, visit http://go.nasa.gov/1SUOO63 .

Questions concerning this program element may be directed to Kevin Murphy at kevin.j.murphy@nasa.gov.

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National Science Foundation’s Historically Black Colleges and Universities — Undergraduate Program

The National Science Foundation is seeking proposals for the Historically Black Colleges and Universities — Undergraduate Program. HBCU-UP is committed to enhancing the quality of undergraduate STEM education and research at Historically Black Colleges and Universities as a means to broaden participation in the nation’s STEM workforce. HBCU-UP realizes this purpose by providing awards to develop, implement, and study innovative models and approaches for making dramatic improvements in the preparation and success of HBCU undergraduate students so that they may participate successfully in graduate programs and/or careers in STEM disciplines.

HBCU-UP provides support for a variety of opportunities. These include:

Research Initiation Awards: These awards provide support for STEM faculty at HBCUs to pursue new research at the home institution, an NSF-funded research center, a research-intensive institution or a national laboratory. The deadline to submit a required notice of intent for a Research Initiation Award is July 26, 2016. Full proposals are due Oct. 4, 2016.

Targeted Infusion Projects, Broadening Participation Research Projects, Implementation Projects, and Achieving Competitive Excellence Implementation Projects: These projects aim to support efforts that increase STEM participation at HBCUs. See the website for individual project descriptions. The deadline to submit a required notice of intent for these projects is Sept. 6, 2016. Full proposals are due Nov. 22, 2016.

Broadening Participation Research Centers: These centers represent the collective intelligence of HBCU STEM highereducation and serve as the national hubs for the rigorous study and broad dissemination of the critical pedagogies and culturally sensitive interventions that contribute to the success of HBCUs in educating African-American STEM undergraduates. Centers are expected to conduct research on STEM education and broadening participation in STEM; perform outreach to HBCUs to build capacity for conducting this type of research; and work to transfer and disseminate promising participation-broadening research to enhance STEMeducation and research outcomes for African-American undergraduates across the country. The preliminary proposal deadline for this opportunity is March 21, 2017. Full proposals are due Nov. 22, 2017.

For more information on the overall Historically Black Colleges and Universities — Undergraduate Program, visithttp://www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp?pims_id=5481.

Please direct questions about these opportunities to Claudia Rankins at crankins@nsf.gov and Andrea Johnson atandjohns@nsf.gov.

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Call for Papers: NASA in the ‘Long’ Civil Rights Movement Symposium

The History Office at NASA‘s Marshall Space Flight Center and the Department of History at the University of Alabama Huntsville invite academics, graduate students and independent scholars to submit proposals for papers to be presented at a two-day symposium, March 16-17, 2017. The symposium will take place at the University of Alabama Huntsville and will address the role/relationship of NASA to the “Long” Civil Rights Movement, particularly in, but not limited to, the Deep South (Huntsville, Florida, Houston, Mississippi and New Orleans).

The conceptual framework for the symposium is provided by Jacquelyn Dowd Hall’s 2005 essay in the Journal of American History, “The Long Civil Rights Movement and the Political Uses of the Past,” which called upon historians to produce new “modes of writing and speaking that emphasize individual agency … while also dramatizing the hidden history of politics and institutions.” Along these lines, the conference welcomes papers addressing the Civil Rights experience across NASAthat not only explore the experience of African Americans, but also of women, immigrants and other politically/legally marginalized groups. The intention is to publish a subset of the papers as an anthology.

Those interested in presenting a paper at the symposium should send an abstract of no more than 400 words and a short biography or curriculum vita, including affiliation, to Brian Odom at brian.c.odom@nasa.gov or Dr. Stephen Waring atwarings@uah.edu by July 31, 2016.

For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/centers/marshall/history/call-for-papers-nasa-in-the-long-civil-rights-movement-symposium-university-of-alabama.html.

Please direct questions about this opportunity to Brian Odom at brian.c.odom@nasa.gov.

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Help NASA Study Mars — Planet Four: Terrains

Help NASA study exotic landscape features near the south pole of Mars! In this citizen science project, you will view images from the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter’s Context Camera. Your input will help scientists identify possible areas for even more detailed examination with the orbiter’s High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment camera. HiRISE can reveal more detail than any other camera ever put into orbit around Mars.

Some of Mars resembles deserts on Earth, but seasonal freezing and thawing of carbon-dioxide ice (known on Earth as “dry ice”) at the Martian poles create some unusual landscape features. There’s a lot of territory to cover, so scientists need your help identifying what and where these features are.

For more information and to learn how to participate, visit the “Planet Four: Terrains” website athttps://www.zooniverse.org/#/projects/mschwamb/planet-four-terrains.

To learn more about NASA‘s Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter and its mission at the Red Planet, visithttp://mars.nasa.gov/mro/.

Please direct questions about this opportunity to Michelle Viotti at michelle.a.viotti@jpl.nasa.gov.

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‘CineSpace’ Short Film Competition

NASA and the Houston Cinema Arts Society once again will offer filmmakers around the world a chance to share their works inspired by — and using — actual NASA imagery through “CineSpace,” a short-film competition.

Films featuring NASA-captured imagery and video collected throughout the agency’s 50-year history will be judged on creativity, innovation and attention to detail. Works submitted to “CineSpace” will compete for cash prizes and the opportunity to be shown to audiences both on and off Earth. In addition to being screened at the “CineSpace” awards ceremony during the Houston Cinema Arts Festival, winners and finalists may be screened at other film festivals across the country, as well as on NASA TV and even on the International Space Station.

“CineSpace” is open to all filmmakers, both professional and aspiring. The competition will accept submissions of all genres, including narrative, documentary, comedy, drama, animation, experimental and others, of up to 10 minutes running time. Entries must use at least 10 percent publically available NASA imagery.

The submission period opens June 1, 2016, and closesJuly 31, 2016. Finalists and winners will be announced at a “CineSpace” event during the Houston Cinema Arts Festival in November. Entries will be competing for $26,000 in prizes with cash awards going to the top three submissions as well as the two films that best demonstrate the themes “Benefits of Space to Humanity” and “Future Space Exploration.”

For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/press-release/cinespace-short-film-competition-returns-for-2016.

Please direct questions about this competition tocinespace@cinemartsociety.org.

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Future Engineers ‘Think Outside the Box’ Challenge

To celebrate the launch of the first-ever expandable habitat to the International Space Station (Bigelow Aerospace’s BEAM) and the launch of the first-ever commercial 3-D printer in space (Made In Space’s Advanced Manufacturing Facility),NASA and the American Society for Mechanical Engineers Foundation are challenging students to think outside the box with 3-D printing — literally. If you are a K-12 student in the United States, your challenge is to design a useful object that assembles, telescopes, hinges, accordions, grows, or expands to become larger than the printing bounds of the Advanced Manufacturing Facility 3-D printer in space (14cm length by 10cm width by 10cm height). The function of your assembled or expanded item can be anything you think would be useful for an astronaut living on the International Space Station.

The ‘Out of the Box’ Challenge is the fourth in a series of challenges where students in grades K-12 will create and submit a digital 3-D model of an object that they think astronauts might need in space. Future Engineers is a multiyear education initiative that consists of 3-D space challenges and curriculum videos on the site that parents and educators can use to get kids designing today.

Think big. Think outside of the box! And good luck!

Entries must be submitted by Aug. 1, 2016.

For more information about the challenge and to watch the launch video, go to www.futureengineers.org/thinkoutsidethebox.

Please email questions about this competition toinfo@futureengineers.org.

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National Science Foundation’s Innovative Technology Experiences for Students and Teachers

The National Science Foundation is accepting proposals for the Innovative Technology Experiences for Students and Teachers, or ITEST, program. This program supports the development, implementation and selective spread of innovative strategies for engaging students in experiences that do the following:

— Increase student awareness of STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) and ICT (information and communications technology) careers
— Motivate students to pursue the education necessary to participate in those careers
— And/or provide students with technology-rich experiences that develop their knowledge of related content and skills (including critical thinking skills) needed for entering the STEM workforce.

ITEST projects must involve students but may also include teachers. The ITEST program is especially focused on broadening participation of students from traditionally underrepresented groups in STEM fields and relatededucation and workforce domains. ITEST strongly encourages projects that actively engage business and industry partners. The resulting relationships better ensure that the students’ experiences foster the knowledge and skill sets needed for emerging STEM-related occupations.

Proposals are due Aug. 10, 2016.

For additional information about the program, including anticipated awards, visit http://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2015/nsf15599/nsf15599.htm.

Please direct questions about this opportunity toDRLITEST@NSF.gov.

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Free Education Webinar Series From the GOES-REducation Proving Ground

The Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites-R series is the next generation of geostationary Earth-observing systems. The GOES-R series satellites will provide continuous imagery and atmospheric measurements of Earth’s Western Hemisphere. The satellites will collect lightning data and monitor space weather to provide critical atmospheric, hydrologic, oceanic, climatic, solar and space data. The first satellite in the GOES-R series is scheduled to launch in October 2016.

To help educators prepare for the new satellite imagery and data that will be available during the GOES-R era, the GOES-R Education Proving Ground will host a series of educationwebcasts leading up to launch.

The webinars will take place on the following Saturday mornings at 11:30 a.m. Eastern Time.

Sept. 17, 2016: Countdown to Launch!

For more information, including log-in instructions for the webinars, visit http://cimss.ssec.wisc.edu/education/goesr/.

Please direct questions about this series of webinars to Margaret Mooney at Margaret.Mooney@ssec.wisc.edu.

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GLOBE El Niño Field Campaign and Webinar Series

El Niño and La Niña are important phenomena that can impact the climate by causing global flooding and droughts as well as changes in seasonal weather. These interactions around the world are called teleconnections. Because of the importance of this issue, a GLOBE ENSO (El Niño Southern Oscillation) Campaign has been formulated to engage students in determining where and how much El Niño affects local places and to put students in contact with their local environment.

To learn more about the campaign and how to participate, visithttp://www.globe.gov/web/el-nino/el-nino-campaign.

To help educators prepare for the El Niño Campaign, GLOBE is hosting a series of free education webinars to discuss the mechanics of the campaign, give updates on data collection, and give participants the opportunity to learn science content from experts.

The final hourlong webinar in the series will take place on the following date at 8 p.m. EDT.

Sept. 19, 2016: El Niño Student Campaign Refresher and Update

For more information, including log-in instructions for the webinars and recordings of previous webinars in the series, visit http://www.globe.gov/web/el-nino/el-nino-campaign/webinars.

Please direct questions about this opportunity and series of webinars to http://www.globe.gov/support/contact.

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National Science Foundation’s Advancing Informal STEM Learning Program

The National Science Foundation is accepting proposals for the Advancing Informal STEM Learning, or AISL, program. This program seeks to advance new approaches to evidence-based understanding of the design and development of STEM learning opportunities for the public in informal environments; to provide multiple pathways for broadening access to and engagement in STEM learning experiences; and to advance innovative research on and assessment of STEM learning in informal environments.

Proposals are due Nov. 8, 2016.

For additional information about the program, including anticipated awards, visit http://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2015/nsf15593/nsf15593.htm.

Please direct questions about this opportunity toDRLAISL@NSF.gov.

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Access NASA Data to Analyze Astronaut Radiation Exposure in Space

Imagine what it would be like to live in space. What kind of shelter would you live in? What kind of protection would you have from the elements? How long could you stay there?

On Earth, humans are protected from radiation by the atmosphere and Earth’s magnetic field. Astronauts on the space station are above the atmosphere and receive a higher dose of radiation than when they are on the ground. The harmful effects of radiation that come from the sun and other sources outside the solar system pose danger to humans living and working in space.

Radiation is one of the top concerns for humans living in deep space for long durations. A NASA group called RadWorks is using radiation detectors the size of USB thumb drives to collect data inside the International Space Station. Together with the University of Houston and the Institute for Research in Schools, RadWorks is sharing the data with high school students who are helping to analyze the radiation that astronaut Tim Peake is exposed to during his time aboard the International Space Station.

NASA is making this same data available to teachers and students through the TimPix project administered by the Institute for Research in Schools, with funding from the European Space Agency and the United Kingdom Space Agency. During European Space Agency astronaut Tim Peake’s time aboard the station, data is taken many times a minute while in orbit. A variety of data sets are currently available, and others are being added as the mission progresses. Aimed at high school physics classes, the TimPix project allows students ages 14-18 to access and analyze radiation data during Peake’s mission. They are able to take part in authentic research occurring aboard the station. What type of radiation is present? What impact do different altitudes or locations around the world have on the number and types of particles detected? What happens during a solar flare? Join us in helping NASA answer these questions!

For more information about NASA’s Radworks project, visithttp://techport.nasa.gov/view/10581.

For more information or to register for the TimPix project, emailtimpix@researchinschools.org.

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Call for Submissions — NASA Announcement for High Impact / Broad Implementation STEM EducationPartnerships (EDUCATION01SP16)

The NASA Headquarters Office of Education, in cooperation with the agency’s four mission directorates, nine centereducation offices, and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory educationoffice, announces this competition to improve science, technology, engineering and mathematics education. Responses must be submitted electronically via the NASAdata system NSPIRES (http://nspires.nasaprs.com).

NASA Education seeks to partner with eligible domestic or international organizations on a no-exchange-of-funds basis to reach wider and more diverse audiences and to achieve mutually beneficial objectives. The announcement places a priority on collaboration involving the following: digital learning; engaging underrepresented groups in STEM; NASA-themed STEM challenges; and youth-serving organizations. NASAalso is receptive to other creative ideas including, for example, investigations or application of science, technology, engineering, arts, mathematics and design, or STEAMD; or activities culturally relevant to or focused on populations underrepresented in STEM careers, such as women, ethnic minorities and persons with disabilities. The announcement explains the criteria used to review responses and NASA’s partnership mechanism known as a no-exchange-of-funds or nonreimbursable Space Act Agreement.

NASA will accept responses on a rolling basis through Dec. 31. 2017.

For more information about this opportunity, visit NSPIRES athttp://go.nasa.gov/1RZwWCi.

If you have any questions about this opportunity, please direct your questions to the Points of Contact listed within the NASAannouncement.