Current NASA Education Opportunities

Check out the following NASA opportunities for the education community. Full descriptions are listed below.

New This Week!
NASA Digital Learning Network Webcast: NASA Space Grant Student Presentations
Audience: All Educators and Students
Event Date: March 3, 2017, 1:30-2:30 p.m. ESTSmithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum Presents ‘Apollo on the Move’ Day of Activities

Audience: All Educators and Students
Event Date: March 4, 2017, at 10 a.m. – 3 p.m. ESTSmithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum Presents ‘Making STEM Magic’ Program
Audience: All Educators and Students
Next Event Date: March 4, 2017, at 10 a.m. – 3 p.m. EST

Nominations for Service on NASA Advisory Council’s Science Committees
Audience: U.S. Citizens With Scientific Expertise
Nomination Deadline: March 8, 2017

Educator Workshop: Making the Most of Your LEGO Mindstorms EV3 Kit
Audience: Formal and Informal Educators of Grades K-12
Event Date: March 11, 2017, 10 a.m.-1 p.m. PST

Host a Real-Time Conversation With Astronauts Aboard the International Space Station
Audience: All Educators
Next Optional Informational Session: March 6, 2017, at 7 p.m. EST
Proposal Deadline: Apr. 15, 2017

Education Webcast Series — STEM@NASA Goddard: Women’s History Month
Audience: All Educators and Students
Next Event Date: March 8, 2017, at 1 p.m. EST

Call for Papers: 2017 International Space Station Research and Development Conference
Audience: Higher Education Educators and Students
Abstract Submission Deadline: March 24, 2017

2018 eXploration Habitat Academic Innovation Challenge
Audience: Higher Education Faculty and Students
Proposal Deadline: April 28, 2017

‘CineSpace’ Short Film Competition
Audience: All Educators and Students
Entry Submission Period: June 1 – July 31, 2017


PREVIOUSLY PROMOTED OPPORTUNITIES…



Sign Up for NASA Education ‘Science WOW!’ Weekly Email Newsletter
Audience: All Educators and Students

Bring the Story of “Hidden Figures” to the Classroom With the “Who Is Katherine Johnson?” Profiles and Modern Figures Toolkit
Audience: K-12 Educators

NASA Cooperative Agreement Notice for EPSCoR International Space Station Flight Opportunity
Audience: Higher Education Institutions With Current or Previously-funded EPSCoR Projects
Application Deadline: March 6, 2017

DEADLINE EXTENDED: Call for Abstracts: 68th International Astronautical Congress
Audience: Full-time U.S. Graduate Students Attending U.S. Universities
New Submission Deadline: March 6, 2017

Celebrate Women’s History Month With a Series of Webcast Events From NASA’s Digital Learning Network
Audience: All Educators and Students
Next Event Date: March 8, 2017, 1 p.m. EST

2017 von Kármán Lecture Series — Attend in Person or View Online
Audience: All Educators; Students in Grades 9-12 and Higher Education
Next Lecture Date: March 9, 2017, at 7 p.m. PDT (10 p.m. EDT)

2017 OPTIMUS PRIME Spinoff Promotion and Research Challenge
Audience: Students in Grades 3-12
Entry Deadline for Grades 3-8: March 13, 2017

2017-2018 Virginia Space Grant Consortium STEM Bridge Scholarships
Audience: Minority Undergraduate Students (Underclassmen) at Virginia Space Grant Consortium Member Institutions
Application Deadline: March 13, 2017

2017-2018 Virginia Space Grant Consortium Community College STEM Scholarship
Audience: Freshman Students at Community Colleges in Virginia
Application Deadline: March 13, 2017

Launch Opportunity: RockSat-XN Program
Audience: Higher Education Educators and Students
Notice of Intent to Fly Deadline: March 15, 2017

Library of Congress 2017 Summer Institutes — Teaching With Primary Sources
Audience: K-12 Educators
Application Deadline: March 17, 2017
Institute Dates: Multiple Dates in June and July 2017

2016-2017 NASA College and University Aeronautics Design Challenges: Supersonic Business Jet and Low Noise Subsonic Transport
Audience: Students at U.S. Colleges and Universities
Required Notice of Intent Due: March 20, 2017
Proposal Deadline: June 1, 2017

NASA/Applied Physics Laboratory Summer Internship 2017
Audience: Undergraduate and Graduate Students
Application Deadline: March 26, 2017

Celebrate Solar Week — Spring 2017
Audience: Educators and Students in Grades 5-9, Informal Educators
Event Dates: March 27-31, 2017

NASA Space Technology Mission Directorate — Early Career Faculty Opportunity
Audience: Early Career Faculty Members at Accredited U.S. Universities
Proposal Deadline: March 31, 2017

NASA and the American Historical Society Seek Applicants for Fellowships in Aerospace History
Audience: Recent Recipients of the Ph.D. in History or a Closely Related Field, and Students Pursuing Doctoral Degrees in Those Fields
Application Deadline: April 1, 2017

NASA Solar Eclipse Workshops at Marshall Space Flight Center
Audience: K-12 Educators
Next Workshop Date: April 4, 2017, 4-6 p.m. CDT

Fly Your Exoplanet on the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite
Audience: All Educators and Students
Submission Deadline: Nov. 20, 2017

Call for Submissions — NASA Announcement for High Impact / Broad Implementation STEM Education Partnerships (EDUCATION01SP16)
Audience: Education Institutions and Organizations
Applications Accepted on a Rolling Basis Through Dec. 31, 2017

Help NASA Search the Realm Beyond Neptune at Backyard Worlds: Planet 9
Audience: All Educators and Students
Project Timeframe: Ongoing

Searchable Portals for Federally Sponsored Opportunities for STEM Undergraduate and Graduate Students
Audience: Undergraduate Students, Graduate Students and Higher Education Institutions



Don’t miss out on upcoming NASA education opportunities
.
For a full list of events, opportunities and more, visit the Educator and Student Current Opportunity pages on NASA’s website:
— Educators http://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html
— Students http://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/current-opps-index.html


NEW THIS WEEK!



Free Education Webinars From NASA Educator Professional Development

The NASA STEM Educator Professional Development Collaborative at Texas State University is presenting a series of free webinars open to all educators. Join NASA education specialists to learn about activities, lesson plans, educator guides and resources that bring NASA into your classroom. Registration is required to participate. To register, simply click on the link provided beneath the webinar description.

Integrating Engineering Into Your Science Classroom
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades 5-12
Event Date: March 2, 2017, at 6:30 p.m. EST
This webinar will give an overview of resources in engineering design and allow participants to discuss methods for integrating engineering design into a science curriculum at multiple levels from 5th through 12th grade. The webinar addresses the Next Generation Science Standard ETS1. Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/224562

Earth Right Now: The Sun and the Water Cycle
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School, and Informal Educators of Grades 3-6
Event Date: March 6, 2017, at 6 p.m. EST
Webinar participants will learn about the NASA storybook “The Sun and the Water Cycle” and its accompanying classroom activities. The webinar also will demonstrate and create a bright, vivid sun for building a 3-D mobile of the sun and the water cycle. This webinar addresses the Next Generation Science Standards ESS2.A and ESS 2.C. Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/223559

Women’s History Month: NASA’s Hidden to Modern Figures
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School and Informal Educators of Grades K-12
Event Date: March 7, 2017, at 4 p.m. EST
The film “Hidden Figures,” based on the book by Margot Lee Shetterly, focuses on the stories of Katherine Johnson, Mary Jackson and Dorothy Vaughan, African-American women who were essential to the success of early spaceflight. This session will present K-12 classroom activities focused on what NASA is working on today. These resources are perfect for use in classes covering English, social studies and history, science, math, and engineering. The webinar will offer additional resources and adaptation recommendations for activities that tie directly to the work portrayed in the movie. Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/224582

Earth Right Now: Elementary GLOBE — Using Picture Books to Initiate STEAM Exploration
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School, and Informal Educators of Grades K-5
Event Date: March 8, 2017, at 4 p.m. EST
This webinar explores science-based storybooks that introduce students to key concepts in water, soil, clouds, seasons, aerosols, climate and Earth system studies. The Elementary GLOBE program offers classroom learning activities complementing the science content covered in downloadable storybooks that further engage students in GLOBE’s seven investigation areas. Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/218043

Earth Right Now: Mission Geography
Audience: Pre-service, In-service, Home School, and Informal Educators of Grades 5-9
Event Date: March 9, 2017, at 6 p.m. EST
NASA Mission Geography is an Earth-based curriculum that integrates STEM, geography and the language arts with Earth observations, remote sensing, and maps that investigate Earth and the processes that shape it, both natural and human-influenced. Using the unique perspective from space, Mission Geography brings Earth to life by promoting active, exciting student learning. The curriculum uses multi-disciplined content and models research and investigation. Register online to participate. https://www.etouches.com/225703

For a full schedule of upcoming NASA Educator Professional Development webinars, visit http://www.txstate-epdc.net/events/.

Questions about this series of webinars should be directed to Steve Culivan at stephen.p.culivan@nasa.gov.



NASA Digital Learning Network Webcast: NASA Space Grant Student Presentations

The National Space Grant College and Fellowship Program is a national network that includes over 950 affiliates from universities, colleges, industry, museums, science centers, and state and local agencies. Each year, Space Grant sponsors interns at NASA facilities.

Join NASA’s Digital Learning Network on March 3, 2017, 1:30-2:30 p.m. EST for presentations from Space Grant supported students from across the country as they present their exciting STEM research projects.

For more information, visit http://www.nasa.gov/dln/special-events.

Please direct questions about this event to DLiNfochannel@gmail.com.



Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum Presents ‘Apollo on the Move’ Day of Activities

The Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum is presenting a day of events to celebrate the Apollo 11 spacecraft before it embarks on a national tour. In October, the spacecraft that carried the Apollo 11 astronauts to the moon and back will leave the National Air and Space Museum for the first time in 46 years. To prepare for its two-year tour, which will stop in four cities across the United States, the command module Columbia currently is undergoing conservation treatment. Join the Smithsonian for this rare opportunity to go behind-the-scenes to learn about the work in progress and talk to experts preserving this historic spacecraft for future generations.

Events are scheduled on March 4, 2017, from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. EST at the National Air and Space Museum’s Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center in Chantilly, Virginia. Learn about the Apollo program, and join conversations about how the moon landing has inspired you — whether you witnessed the event or were born afterward. Explore how Apollo and the moon landing transformed our lives 50 years ago and how it continues to influence space exploration and inspire people today and into the future.

For more information about “Apollo on the Move,” visit https://airandspace.si.edu/events/apollo-move.

Are you unable join in person? Participate online with a daylong webcast and live social media interaction where you may join experts and the community in conversations about Apollo.

Please direct questions about this event to the Visitor Service line at 703-572-4118.



Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum Presents ‘Making STEM Magic’ Program

The Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum is presenting a series of free education events called “Making STEM Magic.” This new program introduces young visitors to engineering in a fun and creative way. Participants learn by doing. Each challenge involves designing, building and testing a prototype. Each month, a new theme will be introduced with a new problem to solve.

Events are scheduled each Saturday from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. ET at the National Air and Space Museum’s Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center in Chantilly, Virginia. The events are free and open to the public.

Suit Up!: Working in Space
Each Saturday in March 2017
Space: It is the final frontier, and the most dangerous. Do you want to be an astronaut? Learn how to suit up and protect yourself from the dangers of space.

In the Heat of the Moment: Space Capsules
Each Saturday in April 2017
Imagine an astronaut hurtling toward Earth in a space capsule at tremendous speeds. In this challenge, participants will design a heat shield to keep the astronaut cool from the heat of re-entry.

Blast Off!: Propulsion
Each Saturday in May 2017
It really is rocket science. Try your hand at designing a rocket and staying on target.

Red Rover: Mission to Mars
Each Saturday in June 2017
Did you know that rovers are robotic ambassadors? Learn more about NASA’s mobile labs and construct your own rolling rover.

For more information about the Smithsonian’s “Making STEM Magic” program, visit https://airandspace.si.edu/visit/events/stem-magic.

Please direct questions about this series of events to the Visitor Service line at 703-572-4118.



Nominations for Service on NASA Advisory Council’s Science Committees

NASA announces its annual invitation for public nominations for service on four new federal advisory committees of NASA that advise NASA on science. The four new committees, which were formerly subcommittees of the NASA Advisory Council, are the Astrophysics Advisory Committee, the Earth Science Advisory Committee, the Heliophysics Advisory Committee, and the Planetary Science Advisory Committee.

U.S. citizens may submit self-nominations for consideration to fill intermittent vacancies on these four science committees. NASA’s science committees have member vacancies from time to time throughout the year, and NASA will consider self-nominations to fill such intermittent vacancies.Nominees will only be contacted should a vacancy arise, and it is judged that their area or areas of expertise are appropriate for that specific vacancy. NASA is committed to selecting members to serve on its science committees based on their individual expertise, knowledge, experience, and current/past contributions to the relevant subject area.

The deadline for NASA receipt of all public nominations is March 8, 2017.

For more information, visit https://www.federalregister.gov/documents/2017/02/23/2017-03541/nasa-federal-advisory-committees.

Please direct questions about this opportunity to Elaine Denning at elaine.j.denning@nasa.gov.



Educator Workshop: Making the Most of Your LEGO Mindstorms EV3 Kit

Do you have experience using Lego Mindstorms EV3 kits in your classrooms or clubs but are hoping to implement new NASA-themed challenges and lessons? Join NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory on March 11, 2017, from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. PST for this workshop at the von Kármán Auditorium at NASA’s JPL in Pasadena, California.

Participants will complete several space-themed challenges for students using programmable robots, as well as share ideas for getting the most from LEGO Mindstorms EV3 Kits. Workshop participants must have prior experience with EV3 kits. Each participant must bring a laptop with the latest EV3 software installed and an EV3 kit preconfigured to workshop specifications.

For more information and to register to attend, visit http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/edu/events/2017/3/11/making-the-most-of-your-lego-mindstorms-ev3s/.

Can’t make it to the workshop? Explore these lessons online at http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/edu/teach/activity/robotic-arm-challenge/,http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/edu/teach/tag/search/The%20Design%20Process and http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/edu/teach/resources/engineering-in-the-classroom.php.

Please direct questions about this workshop to Paula Partida at Paula.S.Partida@jpl.nasa.gov.



Host a Real-Time Conversation With Astronauts Aboard the International Space Station

ARISS-US is accepting proposals from U.S. schools, museums, science centers and community youth organizations (working individually or together) to host an Amateur Radio on the International Space Station, or ARISS, radio contact with an orbiting space station crew member between Jan. 1 and June 30, 2018. Proposals are due April 15, 2017.

ARISS is looking for organizations that will draw large numbers of participants and integrate the contact into a well-developed education plan. Students can learn about satellite communications, wireless technology, science research conducted on the space station, working conditions in space, radio science, and any related STEM subject. Students learn to use amateur radio to talk directly to an astronaut to ask their STEM-related questions. ARISS will help educational organizations locate amateur radio groups who can assist with equipment for this once-in-a-lifetime opportunity for students. Exact dates for the 10-minute radio contact are determined by crew scheduling and space station orbits.

Informational Sessions
To help organizations learn about ARISS radio contacts and the proposal process, ARISS offers one-hour online information sessions and welcomes all questions. Attending an online session is not required but strongly encouraged.

Informational sessions will be offered March 6, 2017, at 7 p.m. EST and March 16, 2017, at 4 p.m. EDT.

Advance registration is necessary. Email ARISS (ariss@arrl.org) to sign up for an information session.

For proposal information and more details such as expectations, proposal guidelines and proposal forms, visit http://www.arrl.org/hosting-an-ariss-contact.

Please email questions about this opportunity to ariss@arrl.org.

ARISS-US is offered through a partnership between NASA, the American Radio Relay League, and the Radio Amateur Satellite Corporation. ARISS was created and is managed by an international working group.



Education Webcast Series — STEM@NASA Goddard: Women’s History Month

Join NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in March for “STEM @ NASA Goddard: Women’s History Month.” On Wednesdays at 1 p.m. ET (March 8, 15, 22 and 29), the Goddard Office of Education will celebrate Women’s History Month by highlighting women in STEM. Women from GSFC in Greenbelt, Maryland, and Wallops Flight Facility in Virginia will share how they practice science, technology, engineering and mathematics through their research, missions, careers, etc.

The 30-minute programs will be streamed live on UStream, and participants will be able to interact with the guest speakers by submitting questions through email and Twitter.

To view the programs on Ustream, visit http://www.ustream.tv/channel/nasa-gsfc.

For more information or to express interest in participating, please contact Erin McKinley at erin.e.mckinley@nasa.gov.



Call for Papers: 2017 International Space Station Research and Development Conference

The sixth annual International Space Station Research and Development Conference will be held July 17-20, 2017, in Washington, D.C.

NASA, the Center for the Advancement of Science in Space, and the American Astronomical Society are seeking abstracts under the categories of Biology and Medicine; Human Health in Space; Commercialization and Nongovernment Utilization; Physical Sciences and Materials Development; Plant Science; Earth Science and Remote Sensing; Technology Development and Demonstration; Finances, and STEM Education (science, technology, engineering and mathematics). Topics should relate to science, exploration and technology activities (past, present, planned or under development) on the International Space Station.

Both the conference and abstract submittal are open to entrepreneurial, commercial, academic and government agency attendees, both from and outside the United States. Eligible attendees include professionals, young professionals, students and interested parties. The working language for the conference is English. The conference will include plenaries for topics of general interest and technical sessions for focused discussions.

Because of the large number of expected submissions, presenters are encouraged to submit abstracts early. The deadline is March 24, 2017.

For more information about the conference and how to submit an abstract for consideration, visit http://www.issconference.org/.

Please direct questions about this opportunity to ISSTechChair@atdl-inc.com.



2018 eXploration Habitat Academic Innovation Challenge

NASA is seeking university teams to develop innovative design solutions for deep-space human exploration systems in the 2018 eXploration Systems and Habitation Academic Innovation Challenge. NASA’s Advanced Exploration Systems Division sponsors the X-Hab Challenge as part of its core function to develop foundational technologies and high-priority capabilities that are the building blocks for future human space missions. Topic areas for this year’s challenge include 3-D printing of biologic materials, long-term hygiene, water condensation, replacement power systems and a Mars habitat commonality.

Working with the National Space Grant Foundation, NASA’s Advanced Exploration Systems Division and Space Life and Physical Sciences Division will offer multiple X-Hab 2018 awards of $20,000 to $30,000. These awards will allow winning teams to design and produce studies or functional products that will increase knowledge and foster risk reduction for space exploration capabilities. Awardees will follow a tailored systems-engineering process with projects being completed in the May 2018 timeframe.

Proposals will be accepted from university faculty who are U.S. citizens and who currently teach at an accredited university in the U.S. Eligible educators must be teaching a senior or graduate engineering design, industrial design or architecture curriculum that is accredited by the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology.

Proposals are due April 28, 2017.

For more information about the challenge and how to submit a proposal, visit http://spacegrant.org/xhab/.

To learn about past NASA X-Hab projects, visit https://www.nasa.gov/exploration/technology/deep_space_habitat/xhab/.

Please email questions about the X-Hab Challenge to xhab@spacegrant.org.



‘CineSpace’ Short Film Competition

NASA and the Houston Cinema Arts Society once again will offer filmmakers around the world a chance to share their works inspired by — and using — actual NASA imagery through “CineSpace,” a short-film competition.

Films featuring imagery captured by NASA and video collected throughout the agency’s 50-year history will be judged on creativity, innovation and attention to detail. Works submitted to “CineSpace” will compete for cash prizes and the opportunity to be shown to audiences both on and off Earth. In addition to being screened at the “CineSpace” awards ceremony during the Houston Cinema Arts Festival, winners and finalists may be screened at other film festivals across the country, as well as on NASA TV and even on the International Space Station.

“CineSpace” is open to all filmmakers, both professional and aspiring. The competition will accept submissions of all genres, including narrative, documentary, comedy, drama, animation, experimental and others, of up to 10 minutes running time. Entries must use at least 10 percent publicly available NASA imagery.

The submission period opens June 1, 2017, and closes July 31, 2017. Finalists and winners will be announced at a “CineSpace” event during the Houston Cinema Arts Festival in November. Entries will be competing for $26,000 in prizes with cash awards going to the top three submissions as well as the two films that best demonstrate the themes “Benefits of Space to Humanity” and “Future Space Exploration.”

For more information, visit https://www.nasa.gov/press-release/cinespace-short-film-competition-returns-for-2017.

Please direct questions about this competition to cinespace@cinemartsociety.org.


PREVIOUSLY PROMOTED OPPORTUNITIES…



Sign Up for NASA Education ‘Science WOW!’ Weekly Email Newsletter

Are you a science educator or interested in science education? Sign up for the NASA Education “Science WOW!” newsletter. Receive an email with NASA’s latest science education offerings delivered “Weekly on Wednesdays.”

Science starts with a question, and so does “Science WOW!” Each week’s message kicks off with a science question and a link to where you can find the answer. “Science WOW!” also highlights an awesome science education tool each week. These featured resources will include NASA apps, interactive games, 3-D printing templates and more!

Plus, “Science WOW!” delivers — right to your inbox — the latest science education opportunities offered by NASA. It’s a simple way to keep up with the latest professional development webinars, student contests, workshops, lectures and other activities.

To register your email address and be added to the list, visit https://www.nasa.gov/education/sciencewow/.



Bring the Story of “Hidden Figures” to the Classroom With the “Who Is Katherine Johnson?” Profiles and Modern Figures Toolkit

In the 1960s, the U.S. was on an ambitious journey to the moon, and Katherine Johnson and her fellow human computers helped get NASA there.Bring the excitement of their story to your classroom with new resources from NASA Education.

Learn more about Katherine Johnson with the “Who Is Katherine Johnson?” profiles written just for students. Versions written for K-4 and 5-8 students are available.

“Who Is Katherine Johnson?” — K-4 Students Version
https://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/k-4/stories/nasa-knows/who-is-katherine-johnson-k4

“Who Is Katherine Johnson?” — 5-8 Students Version
https://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/5-8/features/nasa-knows/who-is-katherine-johnson-5-8

Also available online, the Modern Figures Toolkit is a collection of resources and educational activities for students in grades K-12. Each educational activity and resource includes a brief description, as well as information about how the activities and lessons align to education standards. Resources highlighted include videos, historical references and STEM materials.

Bring Katherine Johnson’s inspiring story to your classroom by downloading the Modern Figures Toolkit at www.nasa.gov/modernfigures-education-toolkit.



NASA Cooperative Agreement Notice for EPSCoR International Space Station Flight Opportunity

NASA’s Office of Education is seeking proposals for the NASA Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research, or EPSCoR, International Space Station Flight Opportunity. Each funded NASA EPSCoR proposal is expected to establish research activities that will contribute significantly to the strategic research and technology development priorities of one or more of NASA’s mission directorates. Funded proposals are expected to contribute to the overall research infrastructure; science and technology capabilities; higher education; and economic development of the jurisdiction receiving funding.

This Cooperative Agreement Notice, or CAN, is for current or previously funded EPSCoR projects that are mature enough to design a research experiment or develop research experimental hardware to the point that it can be flown safely on the International Space Station.

NASA EPSCoR is moving to a two-year procurement cycle. As a result, jurisdictions responding to this CAN may submit up to two proposals. It is anticipated that three to five awards for FY 2017 and three to five awards for FY 2018 of up to $100,000 for each proposal to be expended over a three-year period of performance may be made under this CAN. The exact number of awards depends on the available EPSCoR Research Budget.

Proposals are due March 6, 2017.

For more information and instructions for submitting a proposal, visit http://go.nasa.gov/2ghW90E.

Please direct questions about this request to Jeppie Compton at Jeppie.R.Compton@nasa.gov.



DEADLINE EXTENDED: Call for Abstracts: 68th International Astronautical Congress


NASA announces its intent to participate in the 68th International Astronautical Congress, or IAC, and requests that full-time U.S. graduate students attending U.S. universities respond to this “Call for Abstracts.”

The IAC — which is organized by the International Astronautical Federation, or IAF; the International Academy of Astronautics, or IAA; and the International Institute of Space Law, or IISL — is the largest space-related conference worldwide and selects an average of 1,000 scientific papers every year. The upcoming IAC will be held Sept. 25-29, 2017, in Adelaide, Australia. NASA’s participation in this event is part of an ongoing effort to connect NASA with the astronautical and space international community.

This “Call for Abstracts” is a precursor to a subsequent submission of a final paper, which may be presented at the 68th IAC. Student authors are invited to submit an abstract regarding an original, unpublished paper that has not been submitted in any other forum. A NASA technical review panel will select abstracts from those that have been accepted by the International Astronautical Federation. This opportunity is for graduate students majoring in fields related to the IAF research topics. Students may submit technical (oral) presentations and/or posters. Students may submit abstracts that are co-authored with their Principal Investigators. However, the student must be the “lead author,” and only the student will present at the IAC. Students must be available to travel to the conference to represent NASA and their universities. Students must be U.S. citizens, attending a U.S. university, who plan to enter a career in space science or aeronautics. Pending the availability of funding, graduate students selected by NASA to participate in the IAC will be considered for subsidy funding from NASA.

Many students and professors currently are involved in NASA-related research that could be considered for this submission. Students submitting abstracts are strongly encouraged to seek advice from professors who are conducting NASA research and/or from NASA scientists and engineers. Abstracts must be related to NASA’s ongoing vision for space exploration and fit into one of the following IAC categories:

— Science and Exploration — Systems sustaining missions, including life, microgravity, space exploration, space debris and Search for Extra-Terrestrial Intelligence, or SETI
— Applications and Operations — Ongoing and future operational applications, including earth observation, communication, navigation, human space endeavors and small satellites
— Technology — Common technologies to space systems including astrodynamics, structures, power and propulsion
— Infrastructure — Systems sustaining space missions including space system transportation, future systems and safety
— Space and Society — Interaction of space with society including education, policy and economics, history, and law

The criteria for the selection will be defined according to the following specifications:
— Abstracts should specify purpose, methodology, results, conclusions and areas for discussion.
— Abstracts should indicate that substantive technical and/or programmatic content is included.
— Abstracts should clearly indicate that the material is new and original; they should explain why and how.
— Prospective author(s) should certify that the paper was not presented at a previous meeting.

Abstracts must be written in English, and the length should not exceed 400 words. Tables or drawings are not allowed in the abstract.

NOTE: If you plan to seek assistance from NASA, you must submit to the International Astronautical Federation and to NASA.
— Submit your abstract to the IAF at their website
www.iafastro.org by March 7, 2017 (11:59:00 CET).
— Submit your abstract to NASA at
https://iac.nasaprs.com no later than 11:59 p.m. EST on Monday, March 6, 2017.

IAC Paper Selection
Submitted abstracts will be evaluated by the Session Chairs on the basis of technical quality and relevance to the session topics. Selected abstracts may be chosen for eventual oral or poster presentation. Any such choice is not an indication of quality of the submitted abstract. Their evaluation will be submitted to the Symposium Coordinators. They will make acceptance recommendations to the International Programme Committee, which will make the final decision. Please note that any relevance to the Congress main theme will be considered as an advantage.

The following information must be included in the submission: paper title, name of contact author, name of co-author(s), organization(s), full postal address, phone, email of the author and co-author(s). The abstract should specify purpose, methodology, results and conclusions. The abstract should indicate that substantive technical and/or programmatic content is included, as well as clearly indicate that the material is new and original and explain why and how.

Please check the IAF website (www.iafastro.org) regularly to get the latest updates on the Technical Programme.



Celebrate Women’s History Month With a Series of Webcast Events From NASA’s Digital Learning Network

NASA’s Digital Learning Network will be celebrating Women’s History Month all throughout the month of March by featuring some of the amazing women that work at NASA. Each 45-minute program will feature a different female lead at the agency and how they started their career with NASA.

March 8, 2017, at 1 p.m. EST — Shideh Naderi — Electrical and Software Engineer from NASA’s Armstrong Flight Research Center
March 16, 2017, at 1 p.m. EDT — Nettie Halcomb — Fluid Mechanics Engineer from NASA’s Ames Research Center
March 23, 2017, at 2 p.m. EDT — Erica Alston — Atmospheric Scientist from NASA’s Langley Research Center
March 28, 2017, at 2 p.m. EDT — Kaitlin Liles — Thermal Engineer from NASA’s Langley Research Center

The events will be livestreamed for all schools to watch. For more information, visit https://www.nasa.gov/dln/virtual-visit.

To learn about other Digital Learning Network events, visit http://www.nasa.gov/dln.



2017 von Kármán Lecture Series — Attend in Person or View Online

The Theodore von Kármán Lecture Series, named after the founder of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and presented by JPL’s Office of Communication and Education, shares the excitement of the space program’s missions, instruments and other technologies.

Lectures take place twice per month, on consecutive Thursdays and Fridays. The Thursday lectures take place in JPL’s Theodore von Kármán Auditorium, and Friday lectures take place at Pasadena City College’s Vosloh Forum. Both start at 7 p.m. PDT (10 p.m. EDT). Admission and parking are free for all lectures. No reservations are required, but seating is limited. The Thursday evening lectures are streamed live for viewing online. Archives of past lectures are also available online.

Next Lecture in the Series:

The Cold Atom Laboratory Mission: The Coldest Spot in the Universe
Event Date:
March 9 and March 10, 2017, at 7 p.m. PDT (10 p.m. EDT)
http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/events/lectures_archive.php?year=2017&month=3
Set to launch to the space station in August 2017, the Cold Atom Laboratory will achieve temperatures a billion times colder than the vacuum of space, making the space station home to the coldest spot in the known universe. Join Dr. Anita Sengupta and Dr. Robert Thompson from the CAL Project Team for a discussion about this cutting-edge mission and how it will explore the nature of gravity and dark energy.

For more information about the Theodore von Kármán Lecture Series, including a complete list of upcoming lectures, visithttp://www.jpl.nasa.gov/events/lectures.php.

Questions about this series should be directed to http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/contact_JPL.php.



2017 OPTIMUS PRIME Spinoff Promotion and Research Challenge

NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center invites students in grades 3-12 to take part in the OPTIMUS PRIME Spinoff Promotion and Research Challenge, or OPSPARC. Participants are challenged to help raise awareness and understanding of NASA technologies and their many benefits to our everyday lives.

The challenge provides contestants with a tool, developed by Glogster, for creating and submitting their entries. Glogster is a cloud-based platform for presentation and interactive learning. The tool allows contestants to combine different kinds of media on a virtual canvas to create multimedia posters and to access an existing library of educational content created by students and educators worldwide. Contestants will develop a Glog of their own as part of OPSPARC that will include information on spinoffs and NASA missions. The students also will create video describing their own ideas for a new NASA spinoff technology.

After completing their Glogs, 20 teams of students in grades 9 through 12 will be invited to work with college student mentors to further develop their spinoff concept within a 3-D, multiuser, virtual-world setting through creation of computer-aided design, or CAD, models and application of engineering and business analyses on their spinoff concepts. The InWorld portion of the contest is being sponsored by NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope project.

Students who submit the winning entries in each age category will have the opportunity to visit NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland, for an awards ceremony and workshop to be held in their honor. The workshop will include a behind-the-scenes look at Goddard, the chance to meet some of the top minds at NASA, and the opportunity for the students to design and create their own public service announcement video with guidance from NASA video producers and actor Peter Cullen, the voice of the TRANSFORMERS character OPTIMUS PRIME.

The deadline for students in grades 3-8 to register and submit Glogs is 11:59 PM EDT on March 13, 2017.

To learn more about the challenge and to register to participate, visit http://itpo.gsfc.nasa.gov/opsparc/.

Please direct questions about this contest to Darryl Mitchell at Darryl.R.Mitchell@nasa.gov.

TRANSFORMERS and OPTIMUS PRIME are trademarks of Hasbro and are used with permission. © 2015 Hasbro. All rights reserved.



2017-2018 Virginia Space Grant Consortium STEM Bridge Scholarships

The Virginia Space Grant Consortium is offering renewable scholarships to undergraduate students studying science, technology, engineering or mathematics. The STEM Bridge Scholarships are $1,000.

The scholarships are available to students who are U.S. citizens from any federally recognized minority group and are enrolled full time at one of the five VSGC member universities: The College of William and Mary, Hampton University, Old Dominion University, University of Virginia, and Virginia Tech. Applicants must have completed at least one year of a STEM undergraduate program and be classified as a sophomore during the 2017-2018 academic year.

The STEM Bridge Program connects students to future opportunities by mentoring and guiding them to future VSGC scholarships and NASA-related paid internships. The program encourages students to explore how their majors can apply to NASA’s mission.

This is a competitive program, and awards are based on student academic merit and the quality of interest essay, as well as letters of recommendation from current college faculty who can attest to the student’s interest in STEM areas.

The deadline for submitting applications is March 13, 2017.

For more information, visit http://vsgc.odu.edu/sf/Bridge/. Please email any questions about this opportunity to Tysha Sanford at tsanford@odu.edu.



2017-2018 Virginia Space Grant Consortium Community College STEM Scholarship

The Virginia Space Grant Consortium encourages academically talented individuals to pursue studies and careers in science, technology, engineering and mathematics, or STEM. The VSGC is offering a limited number of scholarships to students majoring in STEM fields at any campus in the Virginia Community College System.

These $2,000 scholarships are competitive awards based on academic merit for students demonstrating an interest in NASA’s missions and STEM-related careers. The VSGC strongly supports students in technical career pathways who are preparing to transfer to institutions of higher learning while developing the essential skills for a competitive global workforce.

Underrepresented minority students, female students and students with disabilities are encouraged to apply. Applicants must be U.S. citizens and enrolled in the Virginia Community College System.

The deadline for submitting applications is March 13, 2017.

For more information, visit http://vsgc.odu.edu/sf/ccstem/. Please email any questions about this opportunity to VSGC@odu.edu.



Launch Opportunity: RockSat-XN Program

The RockSat-XN program is a new partnership between NASA’s Wallops Flight Facility and Andoya Space Center designed to give students access to space at a new launch site as part of the Grand Challenge Initiative. The internationally organized Grand Challenge Initiative is composed of seven rockets that will launch in December 2018 and January 2019 to conduct research on cusp space physics. One of these rockets is the G-CHASER student rocket, which will be flown as part of a new RockSat program called RockSat-XN (RockSat-X Norway). The G-CHASER rocket will launch in early January 2019 from Andoya Space Center in Norway.

The RockSat-XN program provides hands-on experiences to students and faculty advisors to equip them to support the future technical workforce of the United States and other participating countries. The program also can help students and faculty advisors become principal investigators on future science missions of NASA or other institutions.

Student teams are invited to submit an intent-to-fly form before March 15, 2017.

To learn more about RockSat-XN, visit http://spacegrant.colorado.edu/national-programs/rocksat-xn.

Questions about the RockSat-XN program should be directed to rocksatx@gmail.com.



Library of Congress 2017 Summer Institutes — Teaching With Primary Sources

The Library of Congress is now accepting applications for its weeklong summer programs for K-12 educators. Held at the Library of Congress in the District of Columbia, this professional development opportunity provides educators with tools and resources to effectively integrate primary sources into K-12 classroom teaching. Each session focuses on pedagogy, with an emphasis on supporting student engagement, critical thinking and construction of knowledge.

The Library of Congress is offering five programs this summer: Three of the programs are open to teachers and librarians across all content areas; one focuses on primary sources in science, technology and engineering; and the fifth program focuses on World War I. During each five-day institute, participants work with Library of Congress education specialists and subject-matter experts to learn effective practices for using primary sources in the classroom, while exploring some of the millions of digitized historical artifacts and documents available on the library’s website.

General Institutes: Open to K-12 teachers and school librarians across the content areas
— June 19-23, 2017
— June 26-30, 2017
— July 10-14, 2017

Science, Technology and Engineering Institute: Recommended for K-12 educators who teach science, technology or engineering, or collaborate with those who do
— July 17-21, 2017

World War I Institute: Recommended for K-12 educators who teach some aspect of WWI as part of their curriculum, or collaborate with those who do
— July 31-Aug. 4, 2017

Tuition and materials are free. Participants are responsible for transportation to and from Washington, D.C., and any required overnight accommodations.

Applications are due March 17, 2017, and require a letter of recommendation.

For more information and to submit an application, visit http://www.loc.gov/teachers/professionaldevelopment/teacherinstitute/.

Please direct questions about this opportunity to teachinglcsummer@loc.gov.



2016-2017 NASA College and University Aeronautics Design Challenges: Supersonic Business Jet and Low Noise Subsonic Transport

NASA’s Aeronautics Mission Directorate is seeking entries for the 2016-2017 NASA College and University Aeronautics Design Challenge. Students are invited to submit technical papers outlining their solutions for one of two aeronautics design challenges.

The Supersonic Business Jet Challenge seeks ideas for a commercial supersonic business jet that might fly in 2025 and that meets NASA’s goals for noise, emissions, speed, range, payload and fuel efficiency. The Low Noise Subsonic Transport Challenge seeks designs for a large commercial airliner that would enter service between 2025 and 2035 and would address NASA’s goals for reductions in noise, emissions and fuel use.

The contest is open to teams of full-time students enrolled in higher education institutions of the United States or its territories. This particular design challenge is for colleges and universities only. Multidisciplinary teams are encouraged.

Interested teams must submit a notice of intent no later than March 20, 2017. Final entries are due June 1, 2017.

For more information and a complete list of rules, visit https://aero.larc.nasa.gov/university-contest/.

Questions about the challenge should be directed to Elizabeth Ward at Elizabeth.B.Ward@nasa.gov.



NASA/Applied Physics Laboratory Summer Internship 2017

The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, or APL, is offering summer projects for students interested in working on NASA missions or space-related research opportunities.

Students participating in the 2017 NASA/APL Internship Program will work at the APL facility in Laurel, Maryland. Students will receive a stipend for the 10-week program, and housing will be provided.

Eligible students include undergraduate rising sophomores through Ph.D. students as of fall 2017. Applicants must be U.S. citizens and have a minimum GPA of 3.0.

Applications are due March 26, 2017.

For more information about the internship and to apply online, visit http://jhuapl.edu/nasaintern/.

Questions about the NASA/APL Internships Program should be emailed to aplnasaintern-web@jhuapl.edu.



Celebrate Solar Week — Spring 2017

Solar Week provides a weeklong series of web-based educational classroom activities and games with a focus on the sun-Earth connection. This spring’s Solar Week activities will take place March 27-31, 2017, and will highlight safe solar viewing and the total solar eclipse happening on Aug. 21, 2017.

Solar Week is ideal for young teens or groups wanting to know more about the solar system, the stars or astronomy in general. Students can learn about solar careers, sunspots, solar energy and solar storms through a series of activities, games and lessons. Many activities are suitable for fun in the computer lab as well. Participants can interact on the online bulletin board with leading scientists at the forefront of sun-Earth research.

To learn more and to register to participate, visit http://www.solarweek.org.

Questions about Solar Week may be emailed to solarweek@solarweek.org.



NASA Space Technology Mission Directorate — Early Career Faculty Opportunity

NASA’s Space Technology Mission Directorate seeks proposals from accredited U.S. universities on behalf of faculty members early in their careers to conduct space technology research of high priority to NASA. NASA is seeking proposals that plan to pursue innovative, early-stage space technology research in the topic areas specifically enumerated in the solicitation.

Only accredited U.S. universities are eligible to submit proposals on behalf of their outstanding new faculty members who intend to develop academic careers related to space technology. The proposed research must be led by a single, eligible principal investigator. The PI must be an untenured assistant professor on the tenure track at the sponsoring U.S. university at the time of award. The PI must be a U.S. citizen or have lawful status of permanent residency. The PI must be the primary researcher on the effort; co-investigators are not permitted. Collaborators (other than NASA civil servants/JPL) are permitted. See the solicitation for complete requirements regarding eligibility and for definitions and restrictions regarding collaborators.

Notices of Intent are strongly encouraged by March 3, 2017. Proposals are due on or before March 31, 2017.

For complete details and proposal procedures, visit http://go.nasa.gov/2l86ywA.

Questions concerning this opportunity may be directed to hq-ecf-call@mail.nasa.gov.



NASA and the American Historical Society Seek Applicants for Fellowships in Aerospace History

The Fellowships in Aerospace History are offered annually by NASA to support significant scholarly research projects in aerospace history. These fellowships grant the opportunity to engage in significant and sustained advanced research in all aspects of the history of aerospace from the earliest human interest in flight to the present, including cultural and intellectual history, economic history, history of law and public policy, and the history of science, engineering, and management.

NASA provides funds to the American Historical Association, the History of Science Society, and the Society for the History of Technology to allow each association to award a fellowship. These include the Fellowship in Aerospace History, the Fellowship in the History of Space Technology and the Fellowship in the History of Space Science.

The fellowship term is for a period of at least six months, but not more than nine months, and should commence no later than Nov. 15, 2017. The fellow will be expected to devote the term entirely to the proposed research project. Each fellowship carries a stipend of $21,250, which includes travel expenses.

Applicants must possess a PhD in history or in a closely related field, or be enrolled as a student (having completed all coursework) in a doctoral degree-granting program.

Application materials are due April 1, 2017. Applications will be entered into consideration for all three fellowships.

For more information and complete application process details, visit https://apply.interfolio.com/40406.

Questions about this opportunity should be directed to awards@historians.org.



NASA Solar Eclipse Workshops at Marshall Space Flight Center

On Aug. 21, 2017, the United States will experience a solar eclipse. This celestial event will provide a golden opportunity to engage and educate diverse audiences, and NASA has the resources to help. Join the Educator Resource Center at NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama, for a series of grade-level specific educator workshops to learn about safety tips, hands-on activities, resources and more!

April 4, 2017, 4-6 p.m. CDT: Educators of Grades K-2
April 13, 2017, 4-6 p.m. CDT: Educators of Grades 3-5
April 18, 2017, 4-6 p.m. CDT: Educators of Grades 6-8
May 6, 2017, 9-11 a.m. CDT: Educators of Grades K-12
June 1, 2017, 9-11 a.m. CDT: Educators of Grades K-12

For full event details and registration information, visit https://www.nasa.gov/sites/default/files/atoms/files/solar_eclipse_workshop2017.pdf.

Please direct questions about this workshop to Maria Chambers at maria.a.chambers@nasa.gov.



Fly Your Exoplanet on the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite

Set to launch in June 2018, the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite is an explorer-class planet finder. In the first-ever spaceborne all-sky transit survey, TESS will identify planets ranging from Earth-sized to gas giants and will orbit a wide range of stellar types and orbital distances. As the TESS team prepares for launch, it invites the public to ponder what exoplanets might look like and share their ideas in the form of sketches and graphics.

This opportunity is open to all ages and skill levels. Submissions will be collected via email. To download the template for submitting your artwork, visithttps://tess.gsfc.nasa.gov/fly_your_exoplanet.html.

The deadline for submissions is Nov. 20, 2017, or when capacity of the drive carrying the submissions to space is reached, whichever occurs first.

To learn more about the TESS mission, visit https://tess.gsfc.nasa.gov/.

Questions about this opportunity should be directed to GSFC-TESS@mail.nasa.gov.



Call for Submissions — NASA Announcement for High Impact / Broad Implementation STEM Education Partnerships (EDUCATION01SP16)

The NASA Headquarters Office of Education, in cooperation with the agency’s four mission directorates, nine center education offices, and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory education office, announces this competition to improve science, technology, engineering and mathematics education. Responses must be submitted electronically via the NASA data system NSPIRES (http://nspires.nasaprs.com).

NASA Education seeks to partner with eligible domestic or international organizations on a no-exchange-of-funds basis to reach wider and more diverse audiences and to achieve mutually beneficial objectives. The announcement places a priority on collaboration involving the following: digital learning; engaging underrepresented groups in STEM; NASA-themed STEM challenges; and youth-serving organizations. NASA also is receptive to other creative ideas including, for example, investigations or application of science, technology, engineering, arts, mathematics and design, or STEAMD; or activities culturally relevant to or focused on populations underrepresented in STEM careers, such as women, ethnic minorities and persons with disabilities. The announcement explains the criteria used to review responses and NASA’s partnership mechanism known as a no-exchange-of-funds or nonreimbursable Space Act Agreement.

NASA will accept responses on a rolling basis through Dec. 31. 2017.

For more information about this opportunity, visit NSPIRES at http://go.nasa.gov/1RZwWCi.

If you have any questions about this opportunity, please direct your questions to the Points of Contact listed within the NASA announcement.



Help NASA Search the Realm Beyond Neptune at Backyard Worlds: Planet 9

Is a large planet at the fringes of our solar system awaiting discovery, a world astronomers call Planet Nine? Using data from NASA’s Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer mission, NASA scientists are looking for this planet and for new brown dwarfs in the backyard of the solar system. But they need your help! Finding these dim objects requires the human eye to comb through the images to distinguish moving celestial bodies from ghosts and other artifacts. Participants in this citizen science project will share the credit for their discoveries in any scientific publications that result from the project.

For more information and to learn how to participate, visit the “Backyard Worlds: Planet 9” website at http://backyardworlds.org.

To learn more about NASA’s Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer and its mission to image the entire sky in the infrared, visithttps://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/WISE/main/index.html.

Please direct questions about this opportunity to Marc Kuchner at marc.j.kuchner@nasa.gov.



Searchable Portals for Federally Sponsored Opportunities for STEM Undergraduate and Graduate Students

Are you an undergraduate or graduate student seeking opportunities in STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics)? The U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Science — in collaboration with the participating agencies in the National Science and Technology Council’s Committee on STEM Education (CoSTEM) and the Science.gov Alliance — has launched a search portal for both students and universities to discover federally sponsored STEM education training and funding opportunities.

Student users can search the site for opportunities they can apply to directly, such as research internships and fellowships. Likewise, universities can search the site for federal funding opportunities to establish innovative training programs for undergraduates or graduate students.

Users can search the site through faceted searching capabilities for characteristics such as program type, STEM discipline, institution location, federal sponsor, and eligibility. Or they can search through the open text option.

For programs and opportunities for undergraduates, visit http://stemundergrads.science.gov/.

For graduate programs and opportunities, visit http://stemgradstudents.science.gov/.



Don’t miss out on upcoming NASA education opportunities
.
For a full list of events, opportunities and more, visit the Educator and Student Current Opportunity pages on NASA’s website:
— Educators http://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/current-opps-index.html
— Students http://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/current-opps-index.html

Are you looking for NASA educational materials to support your STEM curriculum? Search hundreds of resources by subject, grade level, type and keyword at http://www.nasa.gov/education/resources/.

Find NASA science resources for your classroom. NASA Wavelength is a digital collection of Earth and space science resources for educators of all levels — from elementary to college, to out-of-school programs. http://nasawavelength.org/

Check out the new ‘Explore NASA Science’ website!
Science starts with questions, leading to discoveries. Explore the redesigned NASA Science site and send us feedback. Visit https://science.nasa.gov. To view the site in Spanish, visit http://ciencia.nasa.gov.

Do you just want to receive weekly updates on NASA Education opportunities relating to science? Sign up for the NASA Education “Science WOW!” newsletter for science opportunities delivered to your inbox “Weekly on Wednesdays!” https://www.nasa.gov/education/sciencewow/



Visit NASA Education on the Web:

NASA Office of Eduation: http://www.nasa.gov/education
For Educators: http://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/index.html
For Students: http://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/index.html
NASA Kids’ Club: http://www.nasa.gov/kidsclub